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14 Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights, selection from Chapters 8-16

From Chapter IX, p. 58:
‘Oh!’ said he, releasing me, ‘I see that hideous little villain is not Hareton: I beg your pardon, Nell.  If it be, he deserves flaying alive for not running to welcome me, and for screaming as if I were a goblin.  Unnatural cub, come hither!  I’ll teach thee to impose on a good-hearted, deluded father.  Now, don’t you think the lad would be handsomer cropped?  It makes a dog fiercer, and I love something fierce—get me a scissors—something fierce and trim!  Besides, it’s infernal affectation—devilish conceit it is, to cherish our ears—we’re asses enough without them.  Hush, child, hush!  Well then, it is my darling! wisht, dry thy eyes—there’s a joy; kiss me.  What! it won’t?  Kiss me, Hareton!  Damn thee, kiss me!  By God, as if I would rear such a monster!  As sure as I’m living, I’ll break the brat’s neck.’

Poor Hareton was squalling and kicking in his father’s arms with all his might, and redoubled his yells when he carried him up-stairs and lifted him over the banister.  I cried out that he would frighten the child into fits, and ran to rescue him.  As I reached them, Hindley leant forward on the rails to listen to a noise below; almost forgetting what he had in his hands.  ‘Who is that?’ he asked, hearing some one approaching the stairs’-foot.  I leant forward also, for the purpose of signing to Heathcliff, whose step I recognised, not to come further; and, at the instant when my eye quitted Hareton, he gave a sudden spring, delivered himself from the careless grasp that held him, and fell.

There was scarcely time to experience a thrill of horror before we saw that the little wretch was safe.  Heathcliff arrived underneath just at the critical moment; by a natural impulse he arrested his descent, and setting him on his feet, looked up to discover the author of the accident.  A miser who has parted with a lucky lottery ticket for five shillings, and finds next day he has lost in the bargain five thousand pounds, could not show a blanker countenance than he did on beholding the figure of Mr. Earnshaw above.  It expressed, plainer than words could do, the intensest anguish at having made himself the instrument of thwarting his own revenge.  Had it been dark, I daresay he would have tried to remedy the mistake by smashing Hareton’s skull on the steps; but, we witnessed his salvation; and I was presently below with my precious charge pressed to my heart.

 

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From Chapter IX, pp. 63-64:

 

‘If I were in heaven, Nelly, I should be extremely miserable.’

‘Because you are not fit to go there,’ I answered.  ‘All sinners would be miserable in heaven.’

‘But it is not for that.  I dreamt once that I was there.’

‘I tell you I won’t hearken to your dreams, Miss Catherine!  I’ll go to bed,’ I interrupted again.

She laughed, and held me down; for I made a motion to leave my chair.

‘This is nothing,’ cried she: ‘I was only going to say that heaven did not seem to be my home; and I broke my heart with weeping to come back to earth; and the angels were so angry that they flung me out into the middle of the heath on the top of Wuthering Heights; where I woke sobbing for joy.  That will do to explain my secret, as well as the other.  I’ve no more business to marry Edgar Linton than I have to be in heaven; and if the wicked man in there had not brought Heathcliff so low, I shouldn’t have thought of it.  It would degrade me to marry Heathcliff now; so he shall never know how I love him: and that, not because he’s handsome, Nelly, but because he’s more myself than I am.  Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same; and Linton’s is as different as a moonbeam from lightning, or frost from fire.’

Ere this speech ended I became sensible of Heathcliff’s presence.  Having noticed a slight movement, I turned my head, and saw him rise from the bench, and steal out noiselessly.  He had listened till he heard Catherine say it would degrade her to marry him, and then he stayed to hear no further.  My companion, sitting on the ground, was prevented by the back of the settle from remarking his presence or departure; but I started, and bade her hush!

‘Why?’ she asked, gazing nervously round.

‘Joseph is here,’ I answered, catching opportunely the roll of his cartwheels up the road; ‘and Heathcliff will come in with him.  I’m not sure whether he were not at the door this moment.’

‘Oh, he couldn’t overhear me at the door!’ said she.  ‘Give me Hareton, while you get the supper, and when it is ready ask me to sup with you.  I want to cheat my uncomfortable conscience, and be convinced that Heathcliff has no notion of these things.  He has not, has he?  He does not know what being in love is!’

‘I see no reason that he should not know, as well as you,’ I returned; ‘and if you are his choice, he’ll be the most unfortunate creature that ever was born!  As soon as you become Mrs. Linton, he loses friend, and love, and all!  Have you considered how you’ll bear the separation, and how he’ll bear to be quite deserted in the world?  Because, Miss Catherine—’

‘He quite deserted! we separated!’ she exclaimed, with an accent of indignation.  ‘Who is to separate us, pray?  They’ll meet the fate of Milo!  Not as long as I live, Ellen: for no mortal creature.  Every Linton on the face of the earth might melt into nothing before I could consent to forsake Heathcliff.  Oh, that’s not what I intend—that’s not what I mean!  I shouldn’t be Mrs. Linton were such a price demanded!  He’ll be as much to me as he has been all his lifetime.  Edgar must shake off his antipathy, and tolerate him, at least.  He will, when he learns my true feelings towards him.  Nelly, I see now you think me a selfish wretch; but did it never strike you that if Heathcliff and I married, we should be beggars? whereas, if I marry Linton I can aid Heathcliff to rise, and place him out of my brother’s power.’

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Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights, selection from Chapters 8-16 Copyright © by mea241. All Rights Reserved.

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